Hy-Q Colloquium by Sofie Lindskov, Medical Physicist at Rigshospitalet – University of Copenhagen

Hy-Q Colloquium by Sofie Lindskov, Medical Physicist at Rigshospitalet

Abstract:

George de Hevesy (1885-1966) developed the radioactive tracer principle and became the founder of nuclear medicine through his research partly carried out at the Niels Bohr Institute in the years 1920-1940.
“Clinical Physiology and Nuclear medicine” was defined as a distinct medical specialty in 1982. It offers a minimally invasive examination that yields physiological and functional information. The examinations are based on an injection of a small amount of a radiopharmaceutical (the tracer) that distributes within different tissues according to the carrier molecule. The distribution is imaged using photon detectors. Nuclear medicine examinations can be accompanied by a CT scan yielding anatomical and structural information about the patient. Furthermore, the CT image can be used to correct for the attenuation of the photons emitted in the nuclear medicine examination.
The diagnostic quality of the examination depends on the administered dose, and it is therefore crucial to ensure clinically sufficient image quality, i.e., high enough to assess the clinical questions, while minimizing the patient dose.